Workshop: Pedagogies for Citizenship, Activism and Just Futures, 24 May, UCL

ALPS readers who may be in or around London on 24 May and anyone interested – join us on UCL campus for a workshop on pedagogies for active citizenship and creating a more just future.

The Centre for the Pedagogy of Politics (CPP) and the Climate Politics Cluster (CPC) at the UCL Department of Political Science are joining forces for a day bringing together academics and students interested in the role of political citizenship in pedagogy – related to a range of themes including climate change, conflict and insecurity, gender inequality and assessment diversity for political engagement.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided throughout the day and the event is free to attend!

Find out more, see abstract submissions and sign up here.

Programme highlights include:

Opening address by Professor Bryony Hoskins, chair in Comparative Social Science at the University of Roehampton  

           Panels and discussions on:  

• The pedagogies of climate education and environmental action
• How e-portfolios facilitate students’ civic engagement
• Pedagogies of global (in)security and war
• A chance to chat informally and share experiences with our guests and other educators at all career stages

Online panel event: Methods and Challenges in Teaching Political Theory (14 May, 11:00 – 12:30)

The newly formed Teaching Political Theory Network and UCL’s Centre for the Pedagogy of Politics (CPP) are co-hosting an online panel event on the theme of ‘Methods and Challenges in Teaching Political Theory‘ on 14 May from 11:00-12:30 (UK time).

The event will include contributions from the following panellists on the following topics, alongside audience Q&A:

Diana Popescu-Sarry (University of Nottingham): The least we can do: trigger warnings and teaching the political theory canon.

Matthias Heil (Ruprecht Karls University Heidelberg): Taking teaching seriously.

Ruairidh Brown (Forward College, Lisbon): Dramatic Encounters: Overcoming the barriers to the study of Political Theory for first-generational students using a drama based Pedagogy.

This event follows on from the inaugural conference of the Teaching Political Theory Network at the University of York in June 2023. Contributions to both events are intended to form the basis of an upcoming edited volume on Methods and Challenges in Teaching Political Theory.

This event is open to all and is aimed at political theorists who have an interest in pedagogical scholarship and/or who teach and are interested in more practical insights. 

If you would like to attend, please register beforehand on the following event page, whereupon you will receive access details: Panel event: Methods and Challenges in Teaching Political Theory.

Many thanks to the Teaching Political Theory Network’s Adam Fusco and Sara Van Goozen (University of York) for helping to organise this panel event and leading on the wider suite of activities surrounding it.

Online panel event: Teaching politics through games and simulations (1 May, 3.30 – 5.00pm)

This academic year, the UCL Centre for the Pedagogy of Politics (CPP) is hosting a series of online panel events that bring together a mix of political scientists and political theorists to discuss their work and thoughts on a particular pedagogical theme.

So far, we have held events on ‘Using technology to teach politics’ and ‘Liberating the politics curriculum: theory and practice’. 

Our next panel event is on the theme of ‘Teaching politics through games and simulations’ and is taking place on Wednesday 1 May, 3.30-5.00pm (UK time). The panel includes some ALPS stalwarts:

Simon Usherwood (Professor in Politics & International Studies, Open University) 

Amanda Rosen (Associate Professor & Interim Director, Writing and Teaching Excellence Center, US Naval War College) 

Frands Pedersen (Senior Lecturer in International Relations, University of Westminster) 

Tomer Perry (Assistant Professor of Social Sciences and Philosophy, Minerva University) 

We hope for a wide-ranging discussion on the use (and abuse) of games and simulations for the teaching of political science and political theory with plenty of time for audience Q&A.

The event is aimed at political scientists and political theorists who have an interest in pedagogical scholarship and/or who teach and are interested in more practical tips and insights. 

If you would like to attend, please register beforehand on the following event page, whereupon you will receive access details: UCL CPP panel event: Teaching politics through games and simulations.