Online panel event: Methods and Challenges in Teaching Political Theory (14 May, 11:00 – 12:30)

The newly formed Teaching Political Theory Network and UCL’s Centre for the Pedagogy of Politics (CPP) are co-hosting an online panel event on the theme of ‘Methods and Challenges in Teaching Political Theory‘ on 14 May from 11:00-12:30 (UK time).

The event will include contributions from the following panellists on the following topics, alongside audience Q&A:

Diana Popescu-Sarry (University of Nottingham): The least we can do: trigger warnings and teaching the political theory canon.

Matthias Heil (Ruprecht Karls University Heidelberg): Taking teaching seriously.

Ruairidh Brown (Forward College, Lisbon): Dramatic Encounters: Overcoming the barriers to the study of Political Theory for first-generational students using a drama based Pedagogy.

This event follows on from the inaugural conference of the Teaching Political Theory Network at the University of York in June 2023. Contributions to both events are intended to form the basis of an upcoming edited volume on Methods and Challenges in Teaching Political Theory.

This event is open to all and is aimed at political theorists who have an interest in pedagogical scholarship and/or who teach and are interested in more practical insights. 

If you would like to attend, please register beforehand on the following event page, whereupon you will receive access details: Panel event: Methods and Challenges in Teaching Political Theory.

Many thanks to the Teaching Political Theory Network’s Adam Fusco and Sara Van Goozen (University of York) for helping to organise this panel event and leading on the wider suite of activities surrounding it.

Online panel event: Teaching politics through games and simulations (1 May, 3.30 – 5.00pm)

This academic year, the UCL Centre for the Pedagogy of Politics (CPP) is hosting a series of online panel events that bring together a mix of political scientists and political theorists to discuss their work and thoughts on a particular pedagogical theme.

So far, we have held events on ‘Using technology to teach politics’ and ‘Liberating the politics curriculum: theory and practice’. 

Our next panel event is on the theme of ‘Teaching politics through games and simulations’ and is taking place on Wednesday 1 May, 3.30-5.00pm (UK time). The panel includes some ALPS stalwarts:

Simon Usherwood (Professor in Politics & International Studies, Open University) 

Amanda Rosen (Associate Professor & Interim Director, Writing and Teaching Excellence Center, US Naval War College) 

Frands Pedersen (Senior Lecturer in International Relations, University of Westminster) 

Tomer Perry (Assistant Professor of Social Sciences and Philosophy, Minerva University) 

We hope for a wide-ranging discussion on the use (and abuse) of games and simulations for the teaching of political science and political theory with plenty of time for audience Q&A.

The event is aimed at political scientists and political theorists who have an interest in pedagogical scholarship and/or who teach and are interested in more practical tips and insights. 

If you would like to attend, please register beforehand on the following event page, whereupon you will receive access details: UCL CPP panel event: Teaching politics through games and simulations.

Online panel event: Liberating the politics curriculum: theory and practice (5 February, 3.30 – 5.00pm)

This academic year, the UCL Centre for the Pedagogy of Politics (CPP) is hosting a series of online panel events that bring together a mix of political scientists and political theorists to discuss their work and thoughts on a particular pedagogical theme.

If you are a regular reader of the blog, then you will have enjoyed the recent guest post by one of the panellists from our first event, Simon Sweeney, developing ideas on AI and assessment that he presented at that session.

Our next panel event is on the theme of ‘Liberating the politics curriculum: theory and practice’ and is taking place on Monday 5 February 3.30-5.00pm (UK time). It will include contributions from the following panellists alongside time for audience Q&A:

Prof. Robbie Shilliam (Professor of International Relations, John Hopkins University)

Dr. Manjeet Ramgotra (Senior Lecturer in Political Thought, SOAS University of London)

Dr. Darcy Leigh (Lecturer (Law), University of Sussex)

Dr. Helen McCabe (Associate Professor in Political Theory, University of Nottingham)

The event is aimed at political scientists and political theorists who have an interest in pedagogical scholarship and/or who teach and are interested in more practical tips and insights. We hope for a wide-ranging discussion on liberating/decolonising the curriculum from a variety of perspectives.

If you would like to attend, please register beforehand on the following event page, whereupon you will receive access details: UCL CPP panel event: Liberating the politics curriculum: theory and practice.

We hope to see some of you there for a thought-provoking discussion!

Generative AI changes teaching and learning: how to protect the integrity of assessment

This academic year, the UCL Centre for the Pedagogy of Politics (CPP) is hosting a series of online panel events. Our first event on 30 October was on the theme of ‘Using technology to teach politics’. In this guest post, one of the panellists at that event, Simon Sweeney (University of York), offers further reflections on the challenges involved in higher education’s embracing generative AI, where tools such as ChatGPT call into question issues of authorship and have profound implications for assessment.

A few years ago, we were worrying about students’ using essay mills, a form of contract cheating that plagiarism detection software struggled to identify. The Covid-19 pandemic and online delivery coincided with a reported increase in academic dishonesty (AD). In late-2022 the arrival of generative artificial intelligence (GAI) chatbots like ChatGPT is a further challenge to the integrity of assessment.

Universities realised that banning chatbots was not feasible, as AI has become an established feature in our lives and graduate employment. As educators, we need to respond positively to the opportunities AI presents, recognising its benefits and assimilating AI into teaching and learning practice.

This means developing strategies that accommodate students’ use of GAI while protecting assessment integrity.

Continue reading “Generative AI changes teaching and learning: how to protect the integrity of assessment”

Online panel event: Using technology to teach politics (30 October, 3.30 – 5.00pm)

If you are a regular reader of this blog, then you will have enjoyed recent posts by some of my colleagues at the UCL Centre for the Pedagogy of Politics (CPP), Cathy, JP, and Kalina.

You might also be interested to hear about a series of online panel events UCL CPP is organising this year, each of which will bring together a mix of political scientists and political theorists to discuss their work and thoughts on a particular pedagogical theme.

Our first panel event on the theme of ‘Using technology to teach politics’ is taking place this Monday (30 October) from 3.30-5.00pm (UK time).

Our four panellists are: Dr. Natalie Jester (Gloucestershire), Dr. David Roberts (Loughborough), Prof. Georgina Blakeley (Huddersfield), and Dr. Simon Sweeney (York) .

We hope for a wide-ranging discussion, including reflections on effectively incorporating new tech, concerns about certain uses of tech, and ideas for using older tech in new/better ways, with plenty of time set aside for audience Q&A.

If you would like to attend, you can register beforehand at the following event page, whereupon you will receive access details: UCL CPP panel event: Using technology to teach politics.

We hope to see some of you there for a thought-provoking discussion. If you are unable to attend, fear not – we will be sharing some of the main insights from the events on this blog throughout the year.