The Mercy and Consequences of Assignment Extensions

I’ll admit it: I’m a softy when it comes to granting assignment extensions. Yes, my syllabus includes the standard boilerplate that their papers will randomly self-combust for each day late, but in reality, I offer this in-class guidance: I will grant extensions if they request it in person or via a Zoom or Teams meeting, not email. And by “request,” I mean they must explain exactly why they need an extension. I’ll even accept ridiculous reasons if they’re honest with me (think admitting they turned 21 and made poor life choices). But I offer the following advice at the beginning of my course and reiterate it during these student meetings:

  • I ask, “you realize that you knew about the assignment since the first day of class?” Thankfully, I’m batting 100% “yes” responses.
  • I then show them my OneNote project tracker, further reduced to subtasks and due dates. Indeed, my tracker is my browser homepage, so I can’t escape its caress. This includes research projects, entertainment gaming projects, travel planning, a parking lot for unsorted tasks lacking fixed due dates, and every semester course is broken down into topics, readings, and upcoming assignments–and more checklists for building those assignments. The student’s eyes are saucers at this point.
  • I don’t suggest that they follow my plan exactly–rather, I suggest that they simply have a plan. One that works for them and preferably a method that’s easy to update once created. I then tell a few true stories about when procrastinating and failing to plan cost me big time, one event that could’ve completely changed my entire life trajectory if my own mentor at the time hadn’t offered me the same advice.
  • I then note that their extension affects my and/or my teaching assistant’s planning. One student? Eh, no biggie. Multiple? Now we’re filling their extensions like sand into our scheduling rock jars. I want to be fair in timely grading, but I advise that I don’t expect my TAs to burn their schedules accommodating student extensions.
  • Finally, I advise that, although I’ll grant the extension like a squishy teddy bear, my other major concern is that I’m extending the assignment solely within the context of my course. I have no idea what other courses they’re taking, nor do I have insight on those other course assignments. What happens if I grant an extension and it interferes with their other assignments, which leads to a consequential snowball effect much larger than my assignment? I’ve seen it happen: one extension leads to students falling badly behind in their other classes.

So far I assess this method is a worthy compromise. It’s not that many students on balance and they at least comment that they appreciate the mentoring (and one student I’m aware of adopted my planning format).

That said, I’m curious to read your thoughts in the comments!

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