Innovating in Large Groups: Pair work as a strategy for student engagement

This guest post is part of a series linked to the publication of G. Pleschova & A. Simon (eds.) Learning to teach in central Europe: Reflections from early career researchers. This post comes from Theresa Reidy.

Shpend Voca provides an excellent resource for academics working with large student groups in this chapter on pair work. Building interaction into sessions with students can become a challenge when group numbers exceed the 40-50 mark but this chapter reminds us that innovation and engagement should not be traded when faced with larger student groups.

The chapter is important in four respects.

First, Voca strikes a chord with the opening discussion of the traditional lecture as a passive format and in referring to Bloom’s Taxonomy, highlights the low level learning outcomes which students experience and achieve through this approach. In this sense, the challenge that lecturers face with big groups is clearly set out in the opening section of the chapter.

Second, several examples of discrete engagement strategies which can be used with large groups are elaborated. This is perhaps the most important part of the chapter in that it provides specific options for teaching staff to use in their own practice. The options given include pausing during lectures to allow students to speak with the person sitting next to them to discuss the material provided up to that point, and clarify notes. This is a simple idea and one that could be especially valuable for early year undergraduate students. The author includes further options, which build on this starting suggestion.

The third noteworthy aspect of the chapter relates directly to the robust research design used to evaluate the use of pair work. A clear approach is taken with data collected through several routes. Student evaluations, final grades and a peer observation rubric are used in what is essentially a natural experiment, as there is also a control group taking the same module but without the pair work strategy. This multi-pronged strategy allows for a rigorous interrogation of the pair work and a persuasive presentation of the outcomes.

Which brings me to the final point, the chapter provides conclusive evidence that pair work in large groups enhances the overall learning experience of students. The student evaluations were positive, the learning dividend notable in the comparison with the control group who did not have pair work incorporated into their classes. Indeed, the author downplays the outcomes in the final discussion, they could have been more positive about the pair work given the solid evidence supporting its impact.

Introducing pair work was a small change deployed in a challenging classroom environment but one that delivered clear and demonstrable outcomes. That is the take away message from the chapter and hopefully will one that will be absorbed by colleagues seeking to make their own practice more engaging and effective for students.

This is an important and useful contribution to the scholarship of teaching and learning in the sciences. It is well written, in an accessible style and the structure lends itself to those who are interested in pedagogy and also to those seeking practical advice and guidance. It should be read widely.